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Dai Woosnam of Dai Woosnam

reviews Something to Show by Mick Ryan & Pete Harris

Just typing out the names of the two artistes, got me thinking of Lennon & McCartney. (Eh? Surely I am not suggesting that the Mersey Beat has now a Wessex Beat equivalent? Indeed I am not.)


No, I think of those two illustrious names only insofar as I am reminded of the recent point  attributed rightly or wrongly to Heather Mills-McCartney  that some of the songs should be shown as ”McCartney & Lennon”, in order to illustrate that Sir Paul had made the greater contribution in the writing of that particular song.


And the thought occurred to me that maybe the next Ryan & Harris album should bear their names in reverse. Not that there is any doubt that Mick is the driving force behind their albums, but it would at least give Pete his proper alphabetic precedence, and just this once it would be no more than he deserves. For “Harris & Ryan” would formally acknowledge the vital role he plays in arranging traditional ballads, and indeed many of Mick’s songs. And it would testify to the importance of his dazzling talent as a multi-instrumentalist and his pitch perfect vocal harmonies.    
Without him, Mick would struggle to get a replacement of the same quality: indeed, I doubt if he would ever find a partner whose voice harmonises with his quite so effectively.


If Pete was to leave him, Mick would soon know how Captain Scott felt when Oates and the whisky ran out.


And my mentioning Lennon & McCartney makes me think that there is another parallel: the Beatles never presented us with a bad (or even indifferent) album: and neither have these guys. This is their fifth CD together, and every bit as good as anything in their back catalogue.


I like most of the stuff a lot. The sound is gloriously full: not least because the guys are joined on this album by Paul Burgess on fiddle, Paul Sartin on oboe, and Tim van Eyken on melodeon. (Yes, even Pete cannot play everything!)


The stirring opening track “The Ballad Seller” sets out their stall: straight away the newc