no use in cryin'

by Rattle on the Stovepipe

‘For a rattling good time, let Pete, Dave and Dan rattle on YOUR stovepipe! Great songs and tunes, mostly fiddle-led, but with fine work on banjos, guitars and (sometimes) melodeon, as well’ - Tom Paley

American traditional music demonstrating its links back to UK sources.

Dave Arthur Vocals, Banjo, Guitar, Melodeon
Pete Cooper Vocals, Fiddle, Viola
Dan Stewart Guitar, Banjo



1 ELZICK'S FAREWELL 
Trad 

(Pete fiddle, Dan banjo, Dave guitar) Kentucky-born fiddler Harvey G. Elswick wrote the original in 1889, reportedly playing it as a request for his dying mother. The tune entered aural tradition in West Virginia, where Elswick had moved in 1875, and French Carpenter, who died in 1964, handed it down to Wilson Douglas and Gaither Carlton. A legend that ‘Elzick’ was an ancestor of Carpenter's, and had played the tune before marching away to fight in the Civil War, got added as an attachment. By the late twentieth century, as played by revival fiddlers like Ruthie Dornfeld, the tune lost a few bars here and there but gained a distinctive C-part. Our version’s like Anglo-Irish band Flook’s, but more scrapey and twangy. 

2 SHORT JACKET AND WHITE TROUSERS 
Trad 

(Dave vocal/guitar, Pete fiddle/viola, Dan banjo) Cross-dressing (generally by girls) has always fascinated Grubb Street ballad writers and traditional singers. Many a fo’c’sle and barrack room entertainer must have lived in the hope of discovering just such a young woman in the hammock or bunk next to his. The song was introduced into the folk revival by Bert Lloyd, who unearthed it in Greenleaf and Mansfield’s Ballads and Sea Songs of Newfoundland, and in 1962 recorded it on the album A Sailor’s Garland. He claimed to have also heard a ‘rough’ version from an ex-bosun named Ned Close of London. Following Bert’s habit of song ‘tinkering’, Dave partially rewrote this version after a trip to Virginia, and fitted it to a new tune. 

3 SADIE AT THE BACK DOOR. 
Jere Canote 

(Dave banjo, Dan guitar, Pete fiddle) 

Written in 1980 by fiddler Jere Canote, of Seattle, Washington. Sadie the cat is said to have disdained the cat-flap thoughtfully installed on the front door. 



4 WILLIE MOORE 
Trad 

(Pete vocal/fiddle, Dan guitar, Dave banjo) The verses of this tragic tale circulated in the mountains as a printed broadside ‘ballet’. The identity of the songwriter (‘J.R.G.’ of ‘the cloudy west’) is still a mystery. The song was recorded in 1927 by blind Dick Burnett (vocals and banjo) & Leonard Rutherford (fiddle), of Monticello, Kentucky. ‘I think someone give me that ballet,’ Burnett recalled. ‘Then later someone hummed the tune to me, and I was always quick to catch the tunes, and I already had the ballet, y’know, already had the words. I don’t know if there ever was a real man named Willie Moore 

5 RED APPLE JUICE 
Trad 

(Dave vocal/guitar, Pete fiddle/chorus, Dan banjo) Versions of this song were recorded, as ‘Sugar Babe’ by Dock Boggs in the 1920s, and by Charlie Monroe in the 1940s as ‘Red Rocking Chair’. It took a minimal amount of re-writing to turn it into a narrative for all those people who have lost loved ones too soon. 

6 OLD JOHN PEEL/ ROCK THAT CRADLE, JOE 
Trad 

(Pete fiddle, Dave D/G melodeon/banjo, Dan guitar/banjo) One of those transatlantic melodic overlaps we like so much – a tune version of the Cumbrian National Anthem ‘D’ye ken John Peel?’ from England’s Lake District and a version of a well-known Old Timey dance number played on ‘stereo banjos’. Some sing (to the tune of the B-part), ‘What will you do when the baby cries? – I don’t know What will you do when the baby cries? – Rock that cradle, Joe.’ 

7 YOU’VE BEEN A FRIEND/FRISKY JENNY 
Trad 

(Pete vocal/mandolin/fiddle, Dave guitar/melodeon, Dan banjo) ‘I would have had a broken heart had it not been for you.’ A song recorded in 1936 by The Carter Family and pre-dating Carole King’s similarly themed hit ‘You’ve Got A Friend’ by some thirty years. Followed by the old British country dance tune known variously as ‘Frisky Jenny’, ‘Twenty First of August’ ‘The Gallant Weaver’ and ‘The Weaver’s March’ – the title used by Bert Lloyd on the Industrial theme album The Iron Muse, where we first came across it. Professor Samuel Bayard pointed out that the tune was as well known in Continental Europe as it was in Britain in the early 18th century and he believed it could be French in origin. Later American breakdown versions of the tune include ‘The Cheat’, ‘In My Cottage Near the Wood’ and ‘The Coquette’. 

8 PRINCESS ROYAL 
Trad 

(Dave guitar, Dan banjo, Pete fiddle/viola) A studio noodle we decided to keep. Composed by Irish harpist Turloch Carolan (1670-1738) for a daughter of the ‘Prince of Coolavin’ (as the head of the MacDermot family was known), the tune was used in 1796 in a small London opera, The Lock and Key, and gained currency in England, not least as a Morris tune. 

9 MONDAY MORNING GO TO SCHOOL ('THE TWO BROTHERS'. CHILD 49). 
Trad 

(Dave vocal/guitar, Pete fiddle/chorus, Dan banjo) A fratricide ballad popular in Scotland from at least the early 1800s, and widely collected in America in the 20th century. Cecil Sharp came across fourteen versions of it when tramping the Appalachians in 1916-18 with Maud Karpeles. In Madison County, North Carolina, a remarkable hotbed of singers and storytellers, Sharp generously paid for clothes for the 13-year-old daughter of one of his singers so that she could attend a nearby mission school. The girl, Emma Hensley, repaid the debt some thirty-five years later when Karpeles was retracing Sharp’s earlier collecting trips in the mountains. As Mrs Emma Shelton she recorded, among others, ‘Monday morning go to school’, accompanied on the harmonium, which Dave heard in New York a few years ago. One of her verses that we’ve used as a chorus is almost identical to a verse collected by William Motherwell from the recitation of Widow McCormick in Scotland in 1825. 

10 WAYS OF THE WORLD 
Trad 

(Pete fiddle (AEAE), Dan banjo, Dave fiddlesticks) Beating on the open fiddle strings with straws or knitting needles while the fiddler plays a tune is known in the Appalachian Mountains as playing ‘fiddlesticks’. This is the best known of the tunes associated with fiddler William Hamilton ‘Bill’ Stepp (1875-1947) of Magoffin County, eastern Kentucky. 

11 DAMNED OLD PINEY MOUNTAINS 
Craig Johnson 

(Pete vocals/ fiddle/viola, Dave banjo, Dan guitar) 

Written by Craig Johnson who took the refrain lines from an ex- logger who, as they were talking, kept saying, ‘Buddy, sing a sad old song.’ After another song they'd go on talking about his life, and the sawmill accident that took off his fiddling fingers. ‘Woman don’t you weep for me,’ was another of his phrases, referring to his wife. ‘Skidders’ were placed under the felled trees to help roll them away, while a ‘shay’ was a narrow-gauge steam locomotive used to bring the cargo of logs to the main rail line. 


12 SALLY IN THE GARDEN 
Trad 

(Dan banjo, Dave guitar, Pete fiddle/mandolin) A haunting Old Time tune, originally recorded by Crockett’s Mountaineers, that Dan learned from banjo player Barry Murphy. 

13 DILLARD CHANDLER. 
Dick Connette 

(Dave vocal/guitar), Pete fiddle/chorus, Dan banjo) 

Dillard Chandler, was one of the many celebrated ballad singers from Madison County, North Carolina. He could neither read nor write and lived a hard life in a one-roomed wooden cabin with cracks in the walls through which, on good days, the sun shone and, on bad ones, the rain seeped. He was the subject of John Cohen’s documentary film The End of an Old Song, in which Cohen took the opportunity to show a ballad singer talking about his own interior life, his love life, his isolation and the way he functioned in that mountain society. 

The song was written by Dick Connette, ‘as seen and heard in John Cohen’s 1967 documentary.’ The tune for the verse was taken from ‘Oh My Little Darling’ sung by Alabama banjo-picker Thaddeus C Willingham, and the chorus, ‘Rock about my Sarah Jane’, is from the Uncle Dave Macon song of that title. The words sat in Dave’s ‘to learn’ folder for several years before he was gratefully reminded of the song by a Roy Bailey recording. 



14 ROLL, ALABAMA, ROLL! 
Trad 

(Dave vocal/guitar, Pete fiddle/chorus: Dan banjo/guitar) The C.S.S. Alabama, the Confederate navy’s most successful commerce raider of the American Civil War, was as famous in Britain as in the southern states. Known originally as merely ‘No. 290’, she was built under great secrecy in John Laird’s Birkenhead shipyard on the River Mersey, under the suspicious eyes of northern Federal spies. When finished in July 1862, and ostensibly undergoing sea trials as a cargo vessel, she made a run for the Azores where she was provisioned and armed as a battle cruiser. Here Captain Raphael Semmes and his Confederate officers took command of the ship and its crew, which included around 80 Liverpool seamen who signed the articles of war in expectation of prize-money and adventure. During her two-year career the Alabama took 65 United States ships, destroying 52 of them. Her luck ran out on a sunny day in 1864 when she fought the U.S.S. Kearsage and was sunk in 195 feet of water 6 miles off the French port of Cherbourg. Of the several songs written about the Alabama, this one, even if not strictly historically accurate, seems to have caught the popular imagination of 19th century sailors and folk club singers. We have tweaked it a little by giving it an additional chorus. 
ELZICK'S FAREWELL
(Pete fiddle
SHORT JACKET AND WHITE TROUSERS
(Dave vocal/guitar
SADIE AT THE BACK DOOR.
(Dave banjo
Sample not available
WILLIE MOORE
(Pete vocal/fiddle
Sample not available
RED APPLE JUICE
(Dave vocal/guitar
Sample not available
OLD JOHN PEEL/ ROCK THAT CRADLE
Trad
Sample not available
YOU’VE BEEN A FRIEND/FRISKY JENNY
(Pete vocal/mandolin/fiddle
Sample not available
PRINCESS ROYAL
(Dave guitar
Sample not available
MONDAY MORNING GO TO SCHOOL ('THE TWO BROTHERS'. CHILD 49).
(Dave vocal/guitar
Sample not available
WAYS OF THE WORLD
(Pete fiddle (AEAE)
Sample not available
DAMNED OLD PINEY MOUNTAINS
(Pete vocals/ fiddle/viola
SALLY IN THE GARDEN
(Dan banjo
Sample not available
DILLARD CHANDLER.
(Dave vocal/guitar)
Sample not available
ROLL
ROLL!
Sample not available

Folk Northwest

Derek Gifford

What a refreshing change from the many Wild Goose CDs I've reviewed based on the English tradition. This is real 'old time folksie' American traditional music and song superbly played by three well respected and experienced performers who make up 'Rattle on the Stovepipe'; they are Dave Arthur (voice, banjo, guitar and melodeon), Pete Cooper (voice, fiddle and viola) and Dan Stewart (guitar, banjo).

If you'll pardon the pun, they really do rattle along with both tunes and songs in an easy and confident lilting style that captures the essence of this type of folk music.

It's difficult to pick out particular tracks on an album such as this because the standard is so high on all of them but of the tunes 'Ways of the World' caught my ear because of the 'fiddlesticks' method of playing (the player hits the open strings with a stick) and I particularly liked their performances of the well known 'Princess Royal' and the equally familiar 'Sally in the Garden'.

Of the songs 'Damned Old Piney Mountains' stood out for me as did their version of 'Short Jacket and White Trousers' to which Dave has written a very apt new tune. The poignant and sad 'Red Apple Juice' one of the slower songs nicely sung in a laid back style by Dave contrasts very well with the more up tempo material.

When I first read the track list I was totally intrigued as to what they would do with 'Roll Alabama Roll' especially as it was obviously with full instrumental accompaniment and I tend to be a bit of a purist when it comes to singing shanties! I needn't have worried, of course, because their lilting arrangement fits the song perfectly and, after all, this is one shanty that does actually tell a story which is often lost in the usual full blooded testosterone filled brast of the original work song.

As with the vast majority of Wild Goose albums there are useful sleeve notes on all of the songs and tunes together with some delightful old photographs (no I don't mean the one's of 'old' Dave and Pete!) from American sources.

If you like Appalachian style music then this is a definite buy for you and even if not I can without reservation encourage you to add to your CD collection - you won't be disappointed.

Net Rythms

David Kidman

The stovepipe is well and truly rattled here by this versatile and spiritful trio comprising Dave Arthur (guitar, banjo, vocals) and his compadres Pete Cooper (fiddle and vocal) and Dan Stewart (banjo and guitar), the latter having now taken the place that guitarist Chris Moreton filled on the previous ROTS CD Eight More Miles.

Like its predecessor, No Use In Cryin' proudly presents a wide-ranging collection of tunes and songs that through history have crossed back and forth, here given appealingly and refreshingly in versions from either or both sides of the pond. In healthy juxtaposition, we encounter fiddle tunes from Kentucky, West Virginia and Seattle nestling companionably under the same roof as that good ol' O'Carolan morris tune Princess Royal and a fun medley that bestows a �transatlantic melodic overlap� on D'Ye Ken John Peel, all played in the easily-expert, deft-yet-passionate manner of the genuine old-time enthusiast eager to share his discovery of a good rousing tune.

The instrumental items on the disc (six out of the 14 tracks) are neatly balanced by a satisfyingly varied complement of songs that includes country/jugband standard Red Apple Juice, ballads both broadside and Child in origin (Willie Moore and The Two Brothers respectively), and an unusually upbeat, genially swinging treatment of the shanty-crew classic Roll Alabama Roll. There's also a couple of items of more recent provenance: the Carter Family's mid-30s classic You've Been A Friend and Dick Connette's affectionate tribute to North Carolina singer Dillard Chandler (which, interestingly, Dave acquired from a Roy Bailey recording).

As on Eight More Miles, Dave and Pete each take roughly equal turns with the singing, and both (albeit in contrasted vocal styles) invariably prove themselves well up to the task of authentically and enthusiastically conveying the essence of the texts without any sense of contrivance. The winning formula of the earlier disc is reprised with the approach taken to the provision of the liner notes, for once again these are both succinct and splendidly informative.



This disc possesses a winning combination of erudition and informality in its delightful music-making; in doing so, it proves a real treat for lovers of that fertile territory where old-time traditions from both sides of the Atlantic collide.

Mardles

Mary Humphreys

I put this on the player and was absolutely captivated by the music. It has scarcely been off the player since. Pete Cooper (fiddle, viola & vocals) Dave Arthur (banjo,vocals, guitar and melodeon) and Dan Stewart (guitar, banjo) are Rattle on the Stovepipe and make a superb sound between them. They do a brilliant line in rhythmical and instantlyappealing Old Timey songs and tunes which are well?researched with comprehensive sleeve notes. Some of these tunes and songs are closely related to those of the Old Country and the trio delight in playing the originals so that we can hear the development and evolution. Just listen to the two banjos playing on Rock that Cradle Joe ? a cousin of the Cumbrian national anthem D'ye ken John Peel, which is given an airing so the listener can compare the two.

All but three of the songs and tunes are traditional. The tracks are craftily arranged to give variety and to discourage listener fatigue. Vocals are interspersed with tunes throughout and vocalists are alternated until the end of the CD, when Dave sings the last two numbers which are so well?contrasted that one doesn't even notice!

Dave Arthur, who for many years edited the magazine of the EFDSS has a long track record of research into and performance of traditional song in England and the Appalachian region sings with an edge to the voice that fits the songs like a glove. He plays superbly rhythmical banjo, guitar and melodeon. Pete Cooper has a more mellow voice that suits the more lyrical songs he chooses. He is a much?revered researcher and teacher of fiddle and those of you who frequent London tune sessions may have seen him there with an illustrious set of students, including Verity Sharp who presents Late junction on BBC Radio 3.

Dan Stewart is anew name tome. His banjo playing is to die for and he plays guitar too.

If you want to find out more about the individual members of the group visit www.davearthur.net/rattle.html where you will get plenty of information about them. Pete Cooper has an excellent website well worth checking out with lots of information for fiddlers:www.petecooper.com.

Don't forget, if you want an instant antidote to the blues, go out and buy this CD. You will have a smile on your face right the way through it and for hours afterwards!

Folk London

Brian Cope

This is the band's second album with Dave Arthur, Pete Cooper, and Dan Stewart, playing an eclectic mix of English and American songs and tunes. Playing mostly in the style of the classic old time American string band line up, the whole C.D. has a warm feel good glow running through it.

There is some excellent fiddle and banjo playing and Pete's ability to slip easily between fiddle styles is a joy to hear. On the transatlantic overlap `0ld John Peel - Rock the Cradle Joe' he transforms the sound from that of a traditional English Country dance band to an Appalachian string band in a blink. We are also treated to a banjo led `Princess Royal' with a gentle viola and fiddle accompaniment and the wonderful `Ways of the World' featuring Dave on `fiddlesticks' beating open fiddle strings with knitting needles.

The songs are shared pretty evenly between Dave and Pete and are a mixture of traditional and contemporary but, as to be expected, they are all first-rate and have been given the bands unmistakable stamp as in `Roll Alabama Roll' which benefits from an upbeat treatment and additional chorus. Seven songs in all including the classic `Willie Moore' and a version of the Carter Family's 'You've been a Friend' all supported by detailed notes in a nicely packaged booklet.

A relaxing and enjoyable listen from start to Finish.

Taplas

Roy Harris

RATTLE on the Stovepipe must be one of the jolliest band names around and they live up to it with a joyous sound. Dave Arthur, Pete Cooper and Dan Stewart drive their guitars, banjo, fiddle and melodeon into a bunch of tunes mostly from the American old-time tradition - and a fine bunch they are.

The players may be English but they have the style down pat - and the spirit too. A standout is You've Been a Friend, a heartfelt song in praise of friendship, followed by the splendid tune Frisky Jenny, where the banjo, fiddle, and melodeon blend is a real treat. I love this kind of music. This trio delivers an album that shows why.

Shire Folk

Tom Bell-Richards

Rattle on the Stovepipe are Pete Cooper - fiddle, Dave Arthur vocals, banjo, guitar, melodeon and Dan Stewart - guitar, banjo, and here they present Old Timey songs and tunes, with a few transatlantic influences. The songs tend towards that melancholy/bloody flavour that can make you wonder just what life was like before 1900! Pete Cooper is well known in the UK "fiddle world" both as player and teacher, and like the other members of this trio, he's totally internalised the Old Timey style, (to this English ear anyway.) Dave Arthur sings the first song "Short Jacket and white trousers" (from the cross-dressing-girl-at-sea genre!) in a straight English accent which could make you wonder about issues of "authenticity," but when it's all done as well as this, is it crucial to have grown up in a shack in the Appalachians? Well chosen tempos, liquid fiddling, rock steady banjo and subtle guitar backing make for an excellent cd, rounded off at the end with that great chorus song/shanty "Roll Alabama Roll." Good music for driving!

Shreds and Patches

Chris Yorkie Bartram

Those of you with long memories or who have inherited great LPs from your parents will know that Dave Arthur, with his then wife, Toni, recorded some of the seminal albums of the 1960s "folk revival". Dave was also renowned as a researcher and writer on English song and folklore. He edited "English Dance and Song" the EFDSS magazine for twenty years. But he also toured and collected songs in America. And it is this aspect of his studies that has driven his more-recent ventures.

Pete Cooper spent some time in the 1970s living and playing in the Southern Appalachian mountains; accompanied Holly Tannen on her "Frosty Morning" 1979 LP; played with Tom Paley and later with Pete Stanley. He has, as they say, "paid his dues".

In 2003, together with Chris Moreton on guitar, they recorded a CD called "Return journey", a terrific collection of songs and tunes that are known in related forms on both sides of the Atlantic. This latest CD is another such collection and equally good. Here, instead of Moreton, we have Dan Stewart on guitar and banjo.

But, unlike many singers today (and many less-competent singers over the last 50 years), they do not present that awful "mid-Atlantic sound. Their singing - and playing has all the passion and tone of the old American backwoodsmen - without imitating the accent! I love it.

As is usually the case with WildGoose products, the accompanying notes are very interesting and informative. In fact, you can read those notes without buying the CD � just look on the website. You will also find links there to other reviews, which will tell you much more about the individual tracks. I urge you to read them and then, while you're in the mood, order the CD online. You won't

regret it.

EDS

Robbie Thomas

Rattle on the Stovepipe are Dave Arthur (banjo, guitar, melodeon, vocals), Pete Cooper (fiddle, viola, vocals) and Dan Stewart (guitar, banjo). An EFDSS Gold Badge holder, Dave Arthur edited this august magazine for twenty years, and was one half of the duo Dave and Toni Arthur, recording albums for the Transatlantic, Topic and Trailer labels. Pete Cooper (fiddle, viola, vocals) has many strings to his bow, being a respected performer, writer and fiddle pedagogue. The syllabus of Pete's respected London Fiddle School (based in Cecil Sharp House) reflects his eclectic musical tastes. Dan Stewart, the youngest of the three, is a senior analyst in the pharmaceutical industry and is also a master of the guitar and banjo.

Rattle on the Stovepipe move in the musical realm that stretches between Appalachia and England, although their feet are placed more in the Carolinas than the Costwolds. Their instrumental skills and immersion in their chosen genre are such that you might think that the band is American born and bred. However the songs are sung in the band's native English accents, eschewing the cod, mid-Atlantic accents so often heard in old-time and bluegrass bands from this side of the ocean.  The songs and tunes on this CD reflect the band's area of interest, 'Old John Peel' rubbing shoulders with 'Rock that Cradle, Joe' and Carolan's 'Princess Royal' preceding a version of 'The Two Brothers' collected by Sharp and Karpeles in North Carolina. The arrangements of the songs and tunes sound authentic to the old-time tradition, but also reflect the musicians' musical backgrounds and influences. Dave Arthur handles the majority of the songs and his supple, melodious voice runs smoothly in and around the old-time instrumentation, while Pete Cooper's edgier, tougher-sounding vocals lurk a little deeper inside his two songs, especially in the late Craig Johnson's 'Damned Old Piney Mountains'.

Rattle on the Stovepipe are a band who don't get out and around the country much, so for most of us, their CDs (and YouTube videos) are the only chances that we'll get to hear them. No use in Cryin' lets us experience a band secure in its music and at the height of its powers. If you've heard them before, this is a CD that you'll want, and if you haven't, it's a great place to start.

fRoots

Vic Smith

Pete Cooper and Dave Arthur have been around for decades but this album

shows that they still sing and play with an undiminished enthusiasm.

They present  their traditional material that is carefully researched,

meticulously rehearsed, documented interestingly and performed with

great panache; it all adds up to a thoroughly satisfying album.

Two factors contribute to the group's substantial development since

their previous album. One is the fact that they have developed into a

thoroughly integrated group; it should be remembered that the group

arose from the musicians that were accompanying Dave on a solo album.

The other is how well the style of the much younger new member of the

trio fits with the overall group sound. The sparkle of Dan Stewart's

banjo on an unusual version of Sally In The Garden is one of many very

exciting moments on the album.

Another feature of the development is that the vocals are now shared

equally between Dave and Pete; the fact that everyone raves about Pete's

fiddle playing should not obscure the fact that he is also a very

listenable singer and he finds a way to bring a new vitality to an old

standard, Willie Moore.

If there are some well known songs and tunes given an out of the

ordinary treatment, there is also a couple of particularly interestingly

different versions that Dave has managed to unearth, particularly an

Appalachian version of The Two Brothers.

Whats Afoot

Jerry Bix

This CD is truly a delight from start to finish. Never showy, never flash, its quiet understatement draws you in and fills you with wonder. To describe it as old tyme Americana would be to miss the point completely, even though that clearly is the style if a label is required. Here is a collection of songs and tunes, some very familiar, others less so, presented as fresh as if they were newly minted.

I'm sure you all know the tune �Princess Royal� and many of you will have danced to it, maybe as a Morris jig. Here it could have just come down from the mountains, yet you could still dance that jig. We've all heard (or sung)�Roll, Alabama, Roll� belted out as a shanty; here their banjo, fiddle and guitar rhythms bring the story alive, same words, same tune � new song � it's magic.  Actually it's not magic, its sheer talent and craftsmanship and being at one with the music and the genre.

It sounds authentic, but there are no fake American accents or strident solos to upset the gentle tenor of the whole. My personal favourites are the classic seafaring maid song, �Short Jacket and White Trousers� and the Carter Family �You've been a Friend� � one quintessentially English, the other equally American; brought together, not as strange bedfellows, but as complementary facets of the richness we enjoy in folk music.  

Dave Arthur (Vocals, Banjo, Guitar, Melodeon), Pete Cooper (Vocals, Fiddle, Viola) and Dan Stewart (Guitar, Banjo) will need no introduction to many of you and this I feel is their best offering yet. Throw away any preconceptions about your taste in musical styles and listen to this CD. I promise you will be delighted and entranced.  Then buy it; then play it to all your friends.

Folk Roundabout

The stovepipe is well and truly rattled here by this versatile and spiritful trio comprising Dave Arthur (guitar, banjo, vocals) and his compadres Pete Cooper (fiddle and vocal) and Dan Stewart (banjo and guitar), the latter having now taken the place that guitarist Chris Moreton filled on the previous ROTS CD Eight More Miles. Like its predecessor, No Use In Cryin' proudly presents a wide-ranging collection of tunes and songs that through history have crossed back and forth, here given appealingly and refreshingly in versions from either or both sides of the pond.

In healthy juxtaposition, we encounter fiddle tunes from Kentucky, West Virginia and Seattle nestling companionably under the same roof as that good of 0'Carolan morris tune Princess Royal and a fun medley that bestows a �transatlantic melodic overlap� on D'Ye Ken John Peel, all played in the easily-expert, deft-yet-passionate manner of the genuine old?time enthusiast eager to share his discovery of a good rousing tune. The instrumental items on the disc (six out of the 14 tracks) are neatly balanced by a satisfyingly varied complement of songs that includes country/jugband standard RedAppleJuice, ballads both broadside and Child in origin (Willie Moore and The Two Brothers respectively), and an unusually upbeat, genially swinging treatment of the shanty-crew classic Roll Alabama Roll.

There's also a couple of items of more recent provenance: the Carter Family's You've Been A Friend and Dick Connette's affectionate tribute to North Carolina singer Dillard Chandler (which, interestingly, Dave acquired from a Roy Bailey recording). As on Eight More Miles, Dave and Pete each take roughly equal turns with the singing, and both (albeit in contrasted vocal styles) invariably prove themselves well up to the task of authentically and enthusiastically conveying the essence of the texts without any sense of contrivance.

The winning formula of the earlier disc is reprised with the approach taken to the provision of the liner notes, for once again these are both succinct and splendidly informative. This disc possesses a winning combination of erudition and informality in its delightful music-making; in doing so, it proves a real treat for lovers of that fertile territory where oldtime traditions from both sides of the Atlantic collide.

The Living Tradition

Elaine Bradtke

Rattle on the Stovepipe are Dave Arthur (5string banjo, melodeon, guitar, vocals), Pete Cooper (fiddle, mandolin and vocals) and Dan Stewart (5?string banjo, guitar and vocals), and they play a selection of music from both sides of the Atlantic. It's not easy to pull this off, all too often the subtle differences between the styles get lost in translation. But these chaps are masters of their trade, as can be seen in how they combine "Old John Peel" with "Rock the Cradle Joe", exploiting both the melodic similarities and the stylistic differences of the two melodies.

The vocals on the American tracks lack some of that `high lonesome' (nasal twang) sound peculiar to Appalachian singers, but that may be an acquired taste. The banjo is a delightful surprise on "Princess Royal", it seems almost as if it were written with this instrument in mind. The tragic ballad "Willie Moore" has one of those tunes that niggles the listener with its familiarity, related to Woody Guthrie's 'Jessie James" and half a dozen other songs. They finish with a rousing "Roll Alabama, Roll!" with added chorus material for your singing pleasure. The CD has an overall gently rolling, laid?back feel, and is a pleasure to hear.