Beyond the quay

by Tom and Barbara Brown

A wide range of songs - long, short and tall – all with a touch of the briny about them - but not a shanty in sight.



A wide range of songs - long, short and tall – all with a touch of the briny about them - but not a shanty in sight. It has a distinctly maritime leaning – and also revisits some songs that have been in our repertoire for many years. We’ve also, again, taken the opportunity to work with some additional performers we admire: Keith Kendrick makes a welcome return – he hasn’t been able to make any of our recordings since Where Umber Flows – and it’s been a delight to work with the Askew sisters, Emily and Hazel, (whose combined ages are less then either of us!) who are a formidable duo in their own right, both singing and playing, and who have their own CD with Wild Goose. Malcolm Woods and Joan Holloway have kindly added the odd bit of percussion and we actually got Doug Bailey out from behind the desk for a bit of chorus work too! – and there you have it.

 

TRACK INFORMATION

We first put The Convict Maid with Ten Thousand Miles thirty years ago when we wrote a couple of shows about North Devon maritime history, called Seascape. The Convict Maid is Australian – although the tune, of course, has done good service for many songs including Lord Franklin. Ten Thousand Miles was written by Joseph Geoghegan circa 1860. The two songs together make a nice little story of the transported female felon followed to a new life by her boyfriend – well, that’s the way we read it!

Also from the Seascape project, which led ultimately to the Over The Bar cassette, in 1979, came two songs which Tom wrote for the purpose – Padstow Bar To Lundy Light, which is really a trip up the Atlantic coast, between the two places that have had more influence on our lives than any others, and The Wreck Of The Montagu – a true story which records one of the Admiralty’s most embarrassing moments: not just one battleship aground, but two. It was during the Seascape work that we came to realise how long and intimate North Devon’s relationship with Canada’s Eastern seaboard had been, largely through both the timber and fishing trades. Tom found The Spirits Of George’s Bank in Ballads And Sea Songs Of Newfoundland, by Greenleaf and Mansfield (1933). They collected it from Daniel Endacott – now there’s a good Devon name – at Sally’s Cove in 1920 and Tom mis-learnt the tune that they collected. We thought this was the only version and then discovered another diminished text (The Ghostly Fishermen) in MacEdward Leach’s Folk Ballads and Songs of the Labrador Coast (1965).

It was also during the Over The Bar project that we discovered the shanty Rosabella and its singer, John Short (a.k.a. Yankee Jack) – the Watchet sailor who gave Cecil Sharp 57 shanties – but who didn’t the sing the song he might have: The Watchet Sailor – that came to Sharp from Cpt. Lewis at Minehead in 1906. We’re not aware of The Watchet Sailor being a version of any other song (although, of course, the tune keeps cropping up for songs like Rosemary Lane) so perhaps it is a purely local song.

One that Tom didn’t mis-learn, but had from the man who created it, was Firing The Mauritania. It was written by Redd Sullivan and if it sounds heartfelt - it should do – Redd was a one-time stoker on the Mauritania and used to sing the song with due venom.

We’ve always had a penchant for short songs – not a fragment; but a verse that is, in itself, a complete song or expresses a complete idea. On this CD we’ve strung five of them together in a set. The tunes Brighton Camp (a.k.a. The Girl I Left Behind Me) and the Sailor’s Hornpipe have long been used as ideal vehicles for a multitude of little four-liners: here they are used for Well I Couldn’t Care Less which came from Cyril Tawney, and for Have Another Drink which appears in Doeflinger’s Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman. Cyril was also the source for Americans at Sea – both can be found in his book of songs from the Royal Navy: Grey Funnel Lines. Tom learnt Out In The Lifeboat from Mervyn Vincent who himself had it from Jack Roberts, an old Padstow skipper. Billy Flynn was given to us by Bill Adams at The Yetties club in Sherborne, who said it used to be sung by his grandfather – a naval man. Sadly, we couldn’t get the tune from Bill so Barbara created this one which fits like a glove.

Bonny Sailor Laddie is a happy marriage of tune and words that was contrived by Roy Palmer for his book (and the LP) The Valiant Sailor back in 1973: he took the tune O The Bonny Fisher Lad from Stokoe & Reay’s Songs and Ballads of Northern England and the words from Ashton’s Real Sailor Songs. Roy Palmer is also, in a way, responsible for The Death Of Nelson. This great tune came from the singing of George Dunn of Quarrybank, Staffordshire (and was recorded on Leader Records) the text was collated with a broadside version and also published in The Valiant Sailor.

Barbara couldn’t remember her source for Tarry Trousers but a bit of digging revealed that she had it from the E.F.D.S. publication The Wanton Seed – a version collected by Gardiner from Mrs. Hall of Axford, Basingstoke. Quite how we acquired a guest appearance by Orfeo in the arrangement is a mystery - he somehow found himself a part, like he does! We like songs of strong-willed women (well, Barbara does, anyway) which is why we sing this version of Young Susan – who, unlike the other Young Susan to the same tune, goes of to sea with her bloke instead of wimping it on shore – serves her right that she got shot, then (says Tom)! This Young Susan also comes from Ashton’s Real Sailor Songs although, mostly, of course, they aren’t! We’re beginning to think that ‘her life was not insured’, in v.4, is not a misreading of ‘her life was not ensured’ – because there was a period when, for voyages to China, John Company could indeed not get insurance! This may come as a disappointment to everyone who’s heard us introduce the song over the last twenty years.

Chesapeake and Shannon comes from a broadside and records a battle between the U.S.S. Chesapeake (Cpt. James Lawrence) and H.M.S. Shannon (Cpt. Philip Broke) on the 1st of June 1813. It was a rare victory for the British at sea in the 1812 war – for example, on the 19th of August 1812, the U.S.S. Constitution had captured H.M.S. Guerriere to the same tune!

All round the coast of the U.K. there are versions of The Herring’s Head (or The Red Herring, or The King Of The Sea, etc., etc.,). This version was in the local Devon repertoire way back in the 1960s and we think it originates from the version in the Baring-Gould mss., the ‘as collected’ version of which can be heard with other Baring-Gould collectibles on Paul Wilson & Marilyn Tucker’s CD Dead Maid’s Land (WGS292). Whatever the source, it’s amazing what you can (claim to) do with a herring. Our friends say this version suits us because it is an argument song – we don’t know what they mean! And while on the subject of Little Fishes, here’s a lonesome fisherman doodling away on his concertina and dreaming of other things. It’s one of the songs that we can actually trace the route it took to get to us! From Spencer Tracey (in Captains Courageous), to Eric Ilott, the Bristol shantyman, to Chris Coe (in the Bandoggs piscatorial trilogy) and thence to Barbara. Eric also sang a version of The Bold Princess Royal – but not this one, which highlights the Captain’s cowardice and the Mate’s command capability. Tom got this Bristol version from Albert Lightfoot via Bob Stewart. Bob was the first person we knew who played a harpeleik. That would be a totally irrelevant piece of information, were it not for the fact that, a harpeleik can be heard accompanying The Ship In Distress which is essentially as collected from Mr. Harwood, of Watersfield, Pulborough, Sussex, by George Butterworth in 1907, and subsequently tampered with by Bert Lloyd. It is a straight theft from the Penguin Book Of English Folk Songs, recently revised, updated, and published by the E.F.D.S.S. as Classic English Folk Songs. Another E.F.D.S. publication, Garners Gay, was Barbara’s source for The Blackbird. It was collected by Fred Hamer from the wonderful Shropshire singer May Bradley who said she had heard ‘a modern song like it’, but preferred to sing it ‘in the old way’ – we’re with you, May!

1 The Chesapeake and Shannon 
Traditional 

See description 

2 Tarry Trousers 
Traditional 

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3 Padstow Bar to Lundy Light/Wreck of the Montagu 
Brown/Trad 

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4 The Bold Princess Royal 
Traditional 

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5 The Herring’s Head 
Traditional 

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6 Little Fishes 
Traditional 

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7 The Death of Nelson 
Traditional 

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8 The Watchet Sailor 
Traditional 

See description 

9 Young Susan 
Traditional 

See description 

10 Bonnie Sailor Laddie 
Traditional 

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11 The Spirits of George's Bank 
Traditional 

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12 Short Song Set 
Trad. except Billy Flynn (Barbara Brown) 

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13 The Blackbird 
Traditional 

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14 The Ship In Distress 
Traditional 

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15 Firing the Mauritania 
Sullivan 

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16 The Convict Maid /10,000 miles 
Geogeghan 

See description 
The Chesapeake and Shannon
See description
Tarry Trousers
See description
Sample not available
Padstow Bar to Lundy Light/Wreck of the Montagu
See description
The Bold Princess Royal
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Sample not available
The Herring’s Head
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Little Fishes
See description
Sample not available
The Death of Nelson
See description
Sample not available
The Watchet Sailor
See description
Sample not available
Young Susan
See description
Sample not available
Bonnie Sailor Laddie
See description
The Spirits of George's Bank
See description
Sample not available
Short Song Set
See description
Sample not available
The Blackbird
See description
Sample not available
The Ship In Distress
See description
Sample not available
Firing the Mauritania
See description
Sample not available
The Convict Maid /10
Geogeghan
Sample not available

Shreds & Patches

Nick Howard

Tom and Barbara have been active in the folk world for almost 40 years and many of the songs on this recording have been in their repertoire for many a year.  There's a strong south-west theme to this collection of sea songs, �Beyond the Quay�, sixteen tracks, a good twenty songs.  There's a good number of unusual songs they've dug out or come across and they also have refreshing versions of songs you think you know too well.   The Herring's Head is a great duo version sung in an argumentative question and answer style, not the common aggregating chorus version which I hear often.  A couple of Tom's own songs fit seamlessly in, including the jolliest shipwreck I've ever heard.  No shanties, the nearest they get is a medley of short silly songs.



Tom has a deep rich voice, a clearly phrased traditional style, sounding deceptively straightforward on first hearing, but with many fine inflections which make his songs a real joy on repeated listening.  Barbara to me has two distinct styles in her singing, a clear simpler style which works well when singing harmony with Tom and when singing most of her accompanied songs.  Best of all is her unaccompanied singing; clearly phrased, melodious with sensitive and subtle variations in pitch � quite equal to the Irish 'sean nos' style in its own way.



Altogether this recording grew on me with every listening, their experience manifesting itself in the finely crafted detail of the singing.  There are also 4 past CDs available from their website.  


fRoots

David Kidman

For their fourth WildGoose record, the companionable West Country couple have chosen to present an entire programme of songs with a maritime leaning - but with not a shanty in sight! And it's a resounding success.

Some of its songs have been in Tom and Barbara's repertoire for years in one form or other, but this themed disc furnishes an ideal opportunity to revisit them. Two sets of paired songs have their origins in Seascape, a show about North Devon maritime history which Tom and Barbara put together back in 1979: Padstow Bar To Lundy Light, an evocative travelogue, was specially composed by Tom for the project, as was The Wreck Of The Montagu, the true story of an embarrassing naval disaster. Other songs discovered by Tom & Barbara at around the same time include The Watchet Sailor (for which Tom provides Barbara with an imaginative guitar accompaniment) and the Newfoundland ballad The Spirits Of George's Bank. The latter, together with a further six of the disc's sixteen tracks, is sung unaccompanied - a testament to the excellence of the couple's sturdy singing voices. These are also heard to good effect on The Ship In Distress, for which the sole instrumental accompaniment is provided by some eerie harpeleik (Norwegian fretless zither) chordings. Although Tom and Barbara always treat their chosen (predominantly traditional) sources with respect, they're not averse to having fun with the material too, as their brilliantly characterised �argument� of The Herring's Head demonstrates, while they also relish Redd Sullivan's venomous Firing The Mauritania. Elsewhere, Barbara delights in singing The Blackbird �in the old way� (in the version collected by Fred Hamer from Shropshire singer May Bradley) - as also does Tom with The Bold Princess Royal.

Outside of the purely unaccompanied selections, the Browns are accorded some distinctly spirited backing from (among others) Keith Kendrick and the Askew Sisters, whose contributions so perfectly match Tom and Barbara's own lively, passionate delivery. For instance, I don't think I've heard a more infectious treatment of Ten Thousand Miles (Away): here you can virtually feel the salt spray in the wheezing bellows-action of Hazel's melodeon, with Keith's anglo concertina and Emily's breezy fiddle steering the gallant barque along on the morning tide.

Sporting informative (if somewhat discursive!) booklet notes, this is a superbly programmed, vitally performed collection that convinces on all levels: neither a dry, dusty ship's chest of maritime academia nor a hastily-cobbled set of songs to appeal to the sea-faring novice or tourist, but a significantly entertaining hour's worth of good songs well sung, proving that the traditional folk experience is very much alive and well.

Folk Northwest

Derek Gifford

It's always a pleasure to receive a CD from Wild Goose by these two good friends and this album is no exception. It's down to the sea and all things nautical (the clue is in the CD title!) on this their 4th album with Wild Goose.

As always the performance on all the tracks is carefully arranged and excellently rendered showing both Tom and Barbara's long standing experience with folk song whether contemporary in traditional style or purely traditional works.

Tom accompanies with guitar, melodeon, English concertina and harpeleik (a fretless zither) on many tracks but they are also joined by my old partner in crime Keith Kendrick on some. The Askew Sisters have also been (willingly!) roped in with some lovely instrumental accompaniments as well as chorus singing. They've even got Doug Bailey to help fill in the choruses, Joan Holloway plays the 'nakkers' (bones!) on a track or two and Malcolm Woods plays a tenor drum to good effect on the opening track.

The songs are varied and their version of 'The Herring's Head' is almost type cast for these two... bickering in public.. whatever next! The idea of putting a few songs together in the track entitled 'Short Song Set' works very well with seamless changes from song to song. One of my favourite tracks 'The Bold Princess Royal', sung a capella by Tom, is a fine example of this song and superbly performed.  Likewise, Barbara's empathic rendition of 'Little Fishes', with a subtle concertina accompaniment from Tom, is equally as appealing.

The careful programming of the variety of songs from sad to funny and from slow to up tempo and so on means the album never palls and over an hour of listening passes surprisingly quickly. Add to this interesting and informative sleeve notes from Tom and Barbara and an attractive sleeve design by the talented Hilary Bix and you have almost the perfect album!

EDS

John Bentham

You are cordially invited to join Tom and Barbara Brown on a cruise up the north coast of Devon and Cornwall. From Padstow Bar up to Lundy Light you will be royally entertained by two stalwarts of these parts, ably assisted by a crew of accomplished musicians and singers. Fine performances as you would expect from Tom and Barbara and the same must be said of the accompaniment. Naturally, the fare will be nautical, but as there is no work to be done we have no need of shanties.  Now that's a bit different. This is a trip that, if you haven't the sea-legs, can be equally enjoyed from the comfort of your armchair.  And a grand trip it is too.

There are songs that have been in their repertoire for years and some that are relatively new. The subject range is wide and moves from the depth of storm to the lightest of airs. Although you may think you know most of the songs on reading the play list, think again. Years of collecting and writing mean that there are some very interesting versions offered on this, the fourth collaboration between the Browns and Wild Goose Records.  The insert notes were very interesting but had me scratching my head a bit as they bore no relevance to the running order of the CD.  Another minor irritant is the over printing of black text on a dark background. Definitely one for grumpy old folkies!

A favourite Islay malt of mine has been described as 'sea tangy'. I think it would be fitting to have a glass of the aforesaid near to hand while enjoying this excellent CD.

Folk London

Brian Cope

This is the fourth album from Tom and Barbara and unless one includes their popular compilation of West Country songs, the first one that is thematic in approach.  There is always a risk I feel with building an album around a subject, in making sure that the material is sufficiently varied to maintain interest.  The Browns have achieved this on a variety of fronts, using a successful balance of unaccompanied and accompanied songs, solo and duet performances, and versions of songs that span the familiar to the less so.  As might be expected, the majority of the material is traditional with the exception of Redd Sullivan's heartfelt polemical 'Firing the Mauritania', Joseph Geoghegan's 'Ten Thousand Miles' and Tom's own 7-minute epic 'Padstow Bar to Lundy Light' cleverly coupled with 'Wreck of the Montagu'.  Of the traditional material, the Devon variant of 'The Herring's Head' nestles comfortably with 'Little Fishes' made famous by actor cum 'folk singer' Spencer Tracey, and Broadside Ballads 'Ship in Distress' and 'Bold Princess Royal'.  Although their performance is competently complemented by musicians such as the Askew sisters and Keith Kendrick, the thing that is consistent with the Browns is, what you hear on the CD is what you heard in the club and what you heard in the club you take home on the CD.  Enjoy one and you can't fail to enjoy the other.  

Whats Afoot

Colin Andrews

Although they live just up the road at Combe Martin, it's quite rarely that I hear Tom & Barbara sing, and it often takes a CD such as this to remind me what accomplished performers they are.

This album is, I think, their best yet, with the nautical theme offering a splendid variety of largely less well known traditional songs, of which I especially enjoyed Little Fishes and The Spirits of George's Bank.  Even The Blackbird was  a poignant minor-key variation on the almost music hall sounding familiar version.  The Bonny Sailor Laddie is another song where a real gem of a tune hides behind an unremarkable title.  There's ample light relief from the perils of the deep, transportation and unrequited love in The Herring's Head, and the medley of short songs.  Tom's own compositions, Padstow Bar to Lundy Light & Wreck of the Montagu are also particularly pleasing, with strong local connections.

With unaccompanied pieces, two-part harmony, Tom's own accomplished guitar, melodeon and concertina accompaniment (also the harpeleik whatever that may be!), and support from Keith Kendrick, the Askew sisters, etc. on various instruments, this is a very well balanced album that further enhances Tom & Barbara's already strong reputation as fine singers of great songs.  

Tatters (newsletter of Traditions at the Tiger)

Dave Sutherland

Tom and Barbara Brown, no strangers to Traditions at the Tiger (T.A.T.T.), are these days as well known around the Village Halls of Great Britain, where they perform their popular themed evenings, as they are in the country's folk clubs.  Therefore it is fitting that their latest album, their fourth, is also a themed collection and, as the title suggests, the theme is a nautical one.

Beyond the Quay is made up of sixteen tracks and not a shanty among them as the liner notes affirm; some songs like The Bold Princess Royal, Tarry Trousers, The Ship in Distress and The Death of Nelson are well enough known around the clubs but there are others such as The Watchet Sailor, The Spirits of George's Bank, Bonnie Sailor Laddie and Young Susan which may not be so familiar.

It is doubtful that The Browns could put an album of this type together without including a number of pieces from their native West Country and here we have a local version of The Herring's Head, a set of salty parodies and comic rhymes and a cracking working of Tom's own Padstow Bar To Lundy Light coupled with his arrangement of Wreck of the Montagu.  Barbara's rendition of the former is the song of the album for me, and a must for anyone who has spent time in Cornwall, for if this does not evoke memories then nothing will.

There is a freshness about all the songs contained on the album, never more so than on The Bold Princess Royal, a song that I have heard countless times, but on this hearing I am forced to re-assess this tale for the second time in forty odd years as more enlightenment emerges.

This is a worthy effort from Tom and Barbara Brown who are ably assisted by Emily and Hazel Askew, and our own Keith Kendrick and hopefully it will receive the widespread hearing that it deserves.

One final note on the songs, there is the glorious chorus song Firing the Mauritania from the pen of the late Redd Sullivan and written from personal experience.  Not the sort of thing that you'll find on your average CD.  


Rock n Reel

Dai Jeffries

Tom and Barbara have been around for years, part of the lifeblood of folk clubs and festivals since the 70s.  They've been part of innovative projects and done the unglamorous jobs at festivals and, because what they do might now be considered unfashionable, it's easy to forget what good performers they are. Their fourth duo album has a nautical theme with broadsides and ballads, girls left behind and embarrassing shipwrecks.  Among those innovative projects was Over the Bar from which come two songs composed by Tom, 'Padstow Bar to Lundy Light' and 'Wreck of The Montague', put together in a ten-minute track that's one of the highlights of the record.  Later comes 'Firing the Mauritania' by Redd Sullivan, describing the job he actually did in the 1920s.  Other top tracks are the opening 'The Chesapeake And Shannon' and the old favourite, 'Little Fishes'.  Support comes from the Askew Sisters and Keith Kendrick among others but Tom and Barbara are more than capable of holding a stage unaided.  Here, the guests add contrasting musical textures � flute, fiddle and percussion � without detracting from the essence of Tom and Barbara's performances.  


Shire Folk

Mike Blair

Tom and Barbara are not only experienced performers of traditional folk songs, but also dedicated to collecting, restoring and preserving them.



This collection of 16 maritime songs � and �not a shanty in sight� � shows what a wealth of material there is, and how well they know it. The single theme on this, their 4th CD with WildGoose, is certainly no bar to maintaining interest. There is a huge variety of songs, both serious and fun, from lost love and liberty, to epic voyages of discovery, fishing or transportation, and of course, not forgetting the cross-dressing maid who signs on to follow her sailor love!

Fine unaccompanied harmony singing is ably matched by Tom's guitar, melodeon and concertina playing, and guest appearances from the Askew sisters and Keith Kendrick.

Tom and Barbara are very entertaining live performers, with loads of choruses and humour. They have done well in choosing and arranging this selection, some familiar, some not so, to produce a jolly good listen. Very interesting sleeve notes explain the origins and history of the songs, but there is nothing staid or academic here, just pure entertainment for those of us who love a good tale, far-fetched or otherwise.  

The Living Tradition

Tony Hendry

I remember Tom and Barbara Brown as strong voices on the London folk scene in the 1990s. Then they made their escape to North Devon. Since then, they have enjoyed a golden autumn to their career as one of Britain's best harmony duos. They are noted for their broad repertoire but their fourth CD, Beyond The Quay, has the tang of the sea throughout.

This is a satisfying hour of fighting sailors, wrecked ships, maritime romance, and wondrous herring. But no shanties.

Many songs are unaccompanied, but there is low?key musical support from Hazel and Emily Askew on a range of instruments, Keith Kendrick on concertinas, Malcolm Woods on roped tenor drum, and Joan Holloway on nakkers. The Askews, Keith, and producer Doug Bailey provide a distinguished chorus. The young Askew sisters really get traditional music in a way that some of their peers don't ? it's great to hear them joining hands with an older generation.

The songs are well?researched, with credits scrupulously given in the liner notes. My favourites include the rousing opener The Chesapeake and Shannon (Anglo?US naval battle in 1813); The Herring's Head (an argument song also known as King of the Sea, heard in various versions all around our shores); The Death of Nelson (from the singing of George Dunn of Staffordshire); The Blackbird (from the Shropshire singer May Bradley); the Short Songs set (verses from five songs to the tunes of Brighton Camp and The Sailor's Hornpipe); and Firing The Mauritania (written by Redd Sullivan when he was a stoker on the ship and finding it a rubbish job).

Tom and Barbara's voices are rich and warm, conveying their lifelong delight in traditional song. Each takes their solos ? he goes for bounce and strong rhythm, she is more stately. Together in harmony, they have the natural understanding, which comes from nearly 40 years as a couple since they met at Padstow in 1969. Long may they continue.

Dirty Linen

Duck Baker (Reading, England)

The performers featured on these releases were all young when the folk boom was upon us, but all have had other careers and demands on their time that haven't left much time for performing until recently.  Now they are making up for lost time with these commendable releases for a label that has become possibly the champion of recording traditional English music.

Jack Crawford's Pride of the Season is perhaps the most traditional of these titles in tone, if only because he's a solo singer. Minimal backing is provided on about half of the tracks, and only hard-core listeners will know many of the songs chosen.  For instance, Crawford covers Nic Jones' brilliantly reconstructed �Annan Water� and does quite a nice job with it, but the same singer's version of  �The Ploughman's Love� started Crawford on a long search for the fuller version provided here. Resisting the temptation to overproduction, label chief Doug Bailey has organized accompaniment that brings out the best both from Crawford and his material.

As its title suggests, Dusty Diamonds presents songs (or at least variants that have not been sung often at all. In fact, several seem never to have been recorded before. Martin Graebe has a special feeling for the songs collected by Sabine Baring-Gould, and this material dominates here, though the program also includes a couple of very traditional-sounding songs penned by Graebe himself. Again, accompaniment is minimal, limited to concertina and two fiddles, which are seldom all heard together. Shan Graebe's vocals, like her husband's, are free of affectation, true in pitch, and pleasing in tone. The Graebes don't mind using harmonizations that are not at all by-the-book, which is all as it should be. Better living interpretations than lifeless attempts at �correctness.�

Beyond the Quay is Tom and Barbara Brown's fourth release on Wild Goose, and it's dedicated to songs with seafaring themes. This is a not a sea chanty record, but a collection of ballads, fishermen's ditties, and Navy songs of various kinds. Both Browns are engaging singers and, again, where there is accompaniment, it's tasteful and effective. This record succeeds largely on the strength of a program that holds together particularly well.  A central theme helps (though it's just as easy to wear the listener out with this approach as it is to help the cause), but the songs themselves are all excellent vehicles, and they complement one another beautifully.