September Days

by Lynne Heraud & Pat Turner

Lynne and Pat are firmly established on the folk scene and this, their third album, continues to demonstrate their strong loyalty to the tradition. Their harmonies are outstanding with clear, bright diction and their voices remain as strong as ever. At the same time, their own special muse has not deserted them and, inspired by their travels and experiences (and having gained their diplomas in laughter facilitation) they continue to write and entertain with their own inimitable material.



1 THE COLLIER LADDIE 
Trad – arrangement by Lynne Heraud & Pat Turner 

This lovely song of a rich man spurned for a collier lad was written by Robert Burns. 

2 THE LITTLE TURTLE DOVE 
Trad – arrangement by Lynne Heraud & Pat Turner 

A beautiful song that we got from the singing of the late John Langstaff. It was collected in Somerset by Cecil Sharp. 

3 TWA CORBIES 
Trad – arrangement by Lynne Heraud & Pat Turner 

This ballad is a variant of The Three Ravens which dates back to 1611. It tells the tale of a dead man whose wife, hawk and dog have all deserted him and left his body to the mercy of the crows. 

4 PHEREMONES 
Lynne Heraud & Pat Turner 

Pheremones – that special scent we all have, which (hopefully) attracts us to someone special. 

5 WHITSUNTIDE CAROL 
Trad – arrangement by Lynne Heraud & Pat Turner 

This song was collected from Thomas Coningsby of Whaddon, Cambridgeshire and entered into our psyche from the singing of the Young Tradition. 

6 WHERE IS MY BOY TONIGHT? 
Robert Lowry – arrangement by Lynne Heraud & Pat Turner 

This song was written by Robert Lowry in 1877. Robert Lowry was born in Philadelphia and became a Baptist Minister. The song is a mother’s plea for her son to be saved. It actually sounds like a Victorian Parlour song, but is to be found in the Ira D Sankey book ‘Sacred Hymns and Solos.’ We’d like to dedicate this to our own ‘Wandering Boys’! 

7 THE HARPER 
Pat Turner 

An embodiment, in song, of all the itinerant Irish harpers and bards, whose ghosts still sing and play to us today. 

8 OFF FOR THE OP 
Lynne Heraud & Pat Turner 

A very topical song, which extols the virtues of having yourself peeled, lifted, siliconed and liposuctioned! 

9 LOVELY SUSAN THE MILKMAID 
Trad – arrangement by Lynne Heraud & Pat Turner 

A lovely song from the Frank Purslow collection, it tells of the happy reuniting of a young couple after a long separation. There are no recriminations, no-one pretending to be dead and no-one on the verge of suicide, just an offer of marriage and a happy ending. Ah …………………… 

10 RERES HILL 
Trad – arrangement by Lynne Heraud & Pat Turner 

A traditional Scottish song from Dundee. It begins with a young girl bemoaning her ‘overthrow’ in the first verse and being overjoyed in the last verse when her ‘overthrow’ leads to a proposal of marriage. Some girls have all the luck …….. 

11 SEPTEMBER DAYS 
Jim McCourt – arrangement by Lynne Heraud & Pat Turner 

A beautiful and lyrical song conjuring up wonderful memories of autumn 

12 THE BONNY IRISH MAID 
trad – arrangement by Lynne Heraud & Pat Turner 

A traditional Irish song of the imminent parting of two lovers, due to emigration. 

13 LAMENT OF THE FLITHER GIRLS 
Pat Turner 

Along the North-East coast of England in the 19th century, flithers – limpets – were collected by the fisherwomen to bait the nets of the fishing boats. It was a hard, relentless life for those women born or married into fisher families. This song began life after our friend, Valmai Brown (from Whitby), played us a documentary on the subject and we dedicate this song to Valmai. 

14 FOREIGN FIELDS 
Roger Bryant 

Roger is one of our favourite songwriters and writes immensely singable songs. This song is from the Cornish Songwriters’ production ‘Unsung Heroes’ and is one of the best anti-war songs we know. 
THE COLLIER LADDIE
This lovely song of a rich man spurned for a collier lad was written by Robert Burns.
THE LITTLE TURTLE DOVE
A beautiful song that we got from the singing of the late John Langstaff. It was collected in Somerset by Cecil Sharp.
Sample not available
TWA CORBIES
This ballad is a variant of The Three Ravens which dates back to 1611. It tells the tale of a dead man whose wife
Sample not available
PHEREMONES
Pheremones – that special scent we all have
WHITSUNTIDE CAROL
This song was collected from Thomas Coningsby of Whaddon
Sample not available
WHERE IS MY BOY TONIGHT?
This song was written by Robert Lowry in 1877. Robert Lowry was born in Philadelphia and became a Baptist Minister. The song is a mother’s plea for her son to be saved. It actually sounds like a Victorian Parlour song
Sample not available
THE HARPER
An embodiment
Sample not available
OFF FOR THE OP
A very topical song
Sample not available
LOVELY SUSAN THE MILKMAID
A lovely song from the Frank Purslow collection
Sample not available
RERES HILL
A traditional Scottish song from Dundee. It begins with a young girl bemoaning her ‘overthrow’ in the first verse and being overjoyed in the last verse when her ‘overthrow’ leads to a proposal of marriage. Some girls have all the luck ……..
SEPTEMBER DAYS
A beautiful and lyrical song conjuring up wonderful memories of autumn
Sample not available
THE BONNY IRISH MAID
A traditional Irish song of the imminent parting of two lovers
Sample not available
LAMENT OF THE FLITHER GIRLS
Along the North-East coast of England in the 19th century
Sample not available
FOREIGN FIELDS
Roger is one of our favourite songwriters and writes immensely singable songs. This song is from the Cornish Songwriters’ production ‘Unsung Heroes’ and is one of the best anti-war songs we know.
Sample not available

Puddingstone

John Grey

This is Lynne and Pat's 3rd CD and its 14 tracks are an eclectic mix of traditional songs and their own compositions - both serious and very 'tongue in cheek', together with a few by other writers. There are 7 traditional songs although the first one 'The Collier Laddie' is mostly by Robbie Burns, two others, 'Twa Corbies', and 'Rere's Hill' also originate from North of the Border. 'The Bonnie Irish Maid' tells of a lover's parting 'Lovely Susan the Milkmaid' is of a happy reunion. 'The Little Turtle Dove' is from the Cecil Sharp collection of Somerset songs and 'The whitsuntide Carol' comes from Cambridgeshire.

Two of the songs are by Pat Turner and both are tributes to hard working people of the past. 'The Harper' relates to the Irish Harpers of old and 'The Lament of the flither Girls' is about the women who collected limpets and mussels ('flithers') as bait for the nets of fishing boats from Whitby and other North Eastern ports. The title track 'September Days' paints a beautiful picture of the Autumn season and is written by Jim McCount (See Cover gorgeously illustrated by Hilary Bix). Two of Lynne and Pat's inimitable humerous songs: 'Pheremones' and 'Off for the Op' are included to exercise your chuckle muscles and the CD ends with 'Foreign Fields' by Roger Bryant, a serious and beautiful anti-war song from the Cornish Songwriter's production "Unsung Heroes' which tells the story of "The Lost Gardeners of Helligan' who never returned from the First World War.

In all the songs, the voices of Lynne and Pat blend together in the most beautiful way - the harmonies are very finely worked out and the musical accompaniments give subtle support to the singing. Doug Bailey of Wildgoose has again done an excellent job with the recording and Hilary Bix, of Bideford, has produced some very distinctive design work for the case liner.

Mardles

Mike Everett

During Whitby Folk Week, Lynne and Pat were variously introduced as experienced and stalwarts and veterans of the folk music scene. Im sure theyll write a song about to get even with the MCs. However, this was the first time that Id seen them perform together and I enjoyed it so much I went to see them twice more during the week.

They sing unaccompanied harmonies for much of the time but have a few songs with nicely arranged accompaniment on recorder, guitar and English concertina. Many songs are from the tradition, like The Collier Laddie, Twa Corbies and Whitsuntide Carol, and some from other writers, including the title track by Jim McCourt. But it is on their own material that they really shine. Some of these are very light-hearted, such as Pheromones (on that special pong that we all have) and Off For The Op (on the joys of cosmetic surgery) but there are more serious songs too. Pat Turner has a couple of these on this CD. The Harper is a tribute to all the itinerant Irish harpers and bards, past and present, and the Lament Of The Flither Girls, tells the story of the hard lives led by the lasses who gathered flithers (limpets and mussels) to bait the fishing nets of their menfolk in the North East of England.

All in all, this is a fine album to remind you of their amazing live act and to make sure that you go and listen to them as often as you can.



fRoots

Nick Beale

Another set of very pleasing harmonies from this pair; a little guitar, concertina and recorder come in here and there but mostly it's the two voices. The mixture is pretty much as before and none the worse for that: traditional songs, items by other writers and songs of their own. On the last CD their sense of humour took the vagaries of washing machines as its target. This time it's mating rituals (Pheremones) and cosmetic surgery in Off For The Op with its irresistible chorus of "I'm having me face replaced" and a punchline inviting the listener to inspect the result of some less visible procedures.

Both are firmly in the music hall tradition, musically and lyrically. They falter a little in confronting the question of what an Anglo should do with lyrics majoring on Scots dialect, as with Twa Corbies. Try to adapt your accent or not, you can sound a bit awkward, but this is all personal and subjective since Burns's Collier Laddie sounded fine to me.

Shreds & Patches

Baz Parker

New voices to me, Lynne and Pat sing in harmony and occasionally accompany themselves on recorder (Lynne), guitar, or English concertina (both Pat). The songs are a mixture of traditional and contemporary,

some by Pat and Lynne, others by friends and acquaintances. The harmonies are tight, the instrumental accompaniments carefully thought out, and the choice of songs well suited to the duo's style and vocal range.

Most of the traditional songs are well known, but none the worse for that, Whitsuntide Cell and Reres Hill being particularly fine. Lament of The Flither Girls (Turner) and Foreign Fields (Bryant) prove that there's still some excellent and little known song writing going on out there, and their arrangement of Robert Lowry's Where is my Boy Tonight (from Sankey's Sacred Hymns and Solos) is sublime. The sleeve notes tell us they've "gained their diplomas in laughter facilitation", and a quick listen to Pheromones or Off for the Op will certainly prove why.

An interesting collection of songs well sung and accompanied. What more could you want? "A song including a line about `vaginal tightening!"' I hear you cry. Well, you've got it !

Shire Folk

Tony ONeill

Lynne Heraud and Pat Turner are well known around the scene having sung together for longer than they will admit to and can be seen around the Folk Clubs and Festivals throughout the year. They sing with strong harmonies, both traditional and contemporary as well as their own material, some of it very comical!

This new CD, well produced by Doug Bailey of 'Wild Goose', is a mix of the above, sung mainly acapella but with some sensitive accompaniment when required. The traditional songs are a nice mix of rare (at least, I hadn't heard them!) and standard, subtly arranged by Lynne and Pat, making them sound 'fresh'.

The contemporary material, from song writers the likes of Roger Bryant ('Foreign Fields') and Jim McCourt ('September Days') have been well chosen and again, well arranged by the Lynne and Pat and the CD really comes alive on the two comic tracks 'Pheremones' and 'Off for the Op'.

The CD presentation is pleasing with brief but informative notes about the songs and the whole package can be obtained from Lynne and Pat at their bookings.

Folk in Kent

Bob Kenward

Theres plenty of variety here, for sure: turtle doves and corbies, milkmaids and flither girls, colliers and harpers, foreign fields and the beauties of English Autumn. And then there are the Pheremones, not a Tamla Motown outfit but the celebration of intimate pungencies. All the vibrancy and fun of their live performance has been jauntily recorded by Wild Goose, who justifiably has a name for capturing these elusive qualities on CD.

Particularly enjoyable are the arrangements of traditional material, amounting to half the content, which pay homage to their sources without adhering to them unduly. As a result, songs like Lovely Susan come up afresh, and even the Twa Corbies have new menace. Pat Turners two original songs both have the combination of melody and edge which sets them apart from rosy-tinted views of the past, whilst the lyrics of Off For The Op could only have come from this brace.

No-one else would have the nerve Just the pair, in harmony, with a little guitar, recorder and concertina: great storytelling in song. Ive played it over and over.

Folk London

Lynne and Pat are well established on the folk scene as harmony singers.  Most of their songs come from the English tradition, but they occasionally diversify and perform their own material and Victorian/Edwardian songs.

For me, the hight points of their performances are their own songs and on this CD we have Pheremones  about body smells and f For The p (or Im Having e Face Replaced) is about plastic surgery.

Several of the songs are well known, for instance The Collier Laddie and Twa Corbies, but most are unknown to me.

Where is My Boy Tonight is a strange one.  It is sung very high, with Pat on concertina and sounds as if it is a take off of a Victorian parlour ballad, but apparently is serious.  (The Lyric features on the Bluegrass lyrics website).  Although Pat plays guitar and concertina and Lynne plays recorder, this CD is recorded as you would hear them at a folk club, with no adornments or double tracking, so most of the songs are sung unaccompanied.

EDS

Clive Pownceby

Its rarely you approach entire album thinking, oh thats goodhmm thats impressive and as for that, but this album from the Herts-based pairing is like a well set out party buffet, becoming progressively tastier as one moves through the fare! Agreeably balanced on the cusp of straight-ahead trad. and own-writes, both hilarious and affecting, it starts with a stirring reading of My Collier Laddie a 1792 Burns piece. Followed by The Little Turtle Dove which Sharp found in both Somerset and Appalachia, with Lynnes haunting recorder prominent, you have the essence of what these two do best  a frill-free and effortless intimacy fired by a deep-rooted and heartfelt honesty.

Imbued with an enduring enjoyment of the sheer joy of making music and especially singing, this offering, whilst being a pretty close companion to its two predecessors carries more weight, more verve. There seems a new confidence and purpose here  a timeless immediacy that stays true to their roots whilst being more assured, more skilfully put together.

Pats captivating The Harper is a case in point, lyrically poignant, melodically polished whilst Where Is My Boy Tonight?  Robert Lowrys sobering 1877 song of hoped-for salvation is yearning without being maudlin. With an intuitive grasp of harmony and understated charm, this CD may not be cutting edge  that isnt its remit but it boasts many a quietly varied and inventive touch.  

Small wonder then that Heraud and Turner have cultivated a groundswell of affection as a live act, whether in Club or Festival setting. A convincing set that forges a distinct identity, this release has a touch too much of ... absolutely nothing!

Consistently engrossing is just their default setting.

Taplas

Roy Harris

Harmonisers Lynne Heraud & Pat Turner display strong, clear voices and are able to blend without overpowering the melody they sing, nor the words. 'So What?' you might say. Well many a harmonising group falls down on these very things, thereby robbing the listener and devaluing the song. Not so Heraud & Turner.

On this, their third album they sing self-written songs as well as some not heard so much nowadays traditional ones, l ike Twa Corbies and the lovely Reres Hill. Particularly strong is The Bonny Irish Maid, a gem of a love song. The jauntily amusing Pheromones is one of their own and it's a cracker. Add the names of these two ladies to your 'must hear' list.

The Living Tradition

Dave Tuxford

As with their previous two CDs, September Days sees Lynne Heraud and Pat Turner continue to demonstrate their affinity for traditional music. Skilful arrangement and exquisitely complementary harmonies rejuvenate even well-worn material such as Twa Corbies and The Collier Laddie. However, Heraud and Turner also successfully tackle less familiar numbers like The Whitsuntide Carol, collected in Cambridgeshire and recorded by The Young Tradition, The Bonny Irish Maid and The Little Turtle Dove, collected in Somerset by Cecil Sharp.

The duo would be well worth catching even if their repertoire comprised solely traditional material, of which they are superbly competent interpreters. But Heraud and Turner have an ear for a good `composed' song, as with Jim McCourt's evocative September Days and Roger Bryant's anti-war Foreign Fields. Turner herself proves no slouch as a songwriter with The Harper and Lament Of The Flither Girls ('flithers' - limpets and mussels - were collected by fisherwomen in the nineteenth century to bait the nets of their menfolk - ah, those were the days).

Then, just when you think you have their measure, Heraud and Turner throw in one of their jointly-composed comic numbers. Pheremones hilariously explores the chemistry of attraction: `If you're sniffed by Mr Right you know you can't go wrong.' No, indeed. Off For The Op, in which the duo take cosmetic surgery to its logical absurd conclusion of `having my face replaced', enjoys the unique distinction of featuring both nipple hair removal and vaginal tightening, reference to which (in live performance) brings guffaws from female members of the audience and nervous shuffling from the men - I can't imagine why. It's a tribute to the performance skills of Lynne Heraud and Pat Turner that they succeed in pulling it off so triumphantly. The change of mood, I mean.