The Moon Shines Bright

by Lynne Heraud & Pat Turner

Heraud and Turner take their listeners on a magical journey through their varied repertoire of traditional and contemporary songs. When it sounds this good, its worth clambering aboard. Living Tradition) Riveting with any song and unbeatable as soon as they approach the traditional repertoire (Folk London)



The Moon Shines Bright (Trad) 
Take heed from this joyful song with a very clear message. It was collected from James Beale in Warehorne, Kent in 1908 and is one of the songs in the delightful EFDSS publication Still Growing.

 


Autumn Is Down (Pat Turner) 
A seasonal sally into our agricultural past.  You have to imagine winsome lads, buxom lasses and lamplit glades in the forest.

 


Therell Never Be Peace Until Jamie Comes Home (Robert Burns) 
Robert Burns sent the words of this song to his friend Alex Cunningham, which was then set to the Jacobite air There Are Few Good Fellows When Jamies Awa.  Needless to say, this song was originally written in Scottish dialect, but has been ably Anglicised by Pat!

 


Odd Sock (Lynne Heraud) 
This is a song that was written after a discussion with friends about the odd sock phenomenon.  No-one seems to know why we all end up with a pile of unmatching socks. We feel that there are a lot of people who have the characteristics of odd socks!

 


Where The Seeds Of Love Grew (Keith Scowcroft/Lynne Heraud) 
A poem from the prolific pen of Keith (Scowie) Scowcroft with a tune by Lynne.  Scowie has had three volumes of poetry published and some of those poems have been set to music and are sung up and down the country.

 


Cupids Garden (Trad) 
A joyful song from the much loves Copper family from Rottingdean in Susses/

 


Man In Grey (Pat Turner) 
A topical comment.  The Man in Grey can be whoever you want him to be .

 


Fair Maid of Islington (Trad) 
This is also known as The Vintner Over-Reached and he certainly was! The tune is Caper and Ferk which was written by William Byrd in the early 17th century. The words appear in Thomas D'Urfey's Pills to Purge Melancholy (1707).  

 


Regret (Lynne Heraud) 
Most of us, at some time in our lives, have found ourselves in a position we never thought to be in and consequently wished ourselves somewhere else.  

 


The Golden Wheat 
A beautiful Welsh Air, with English words by Will Sanhow.

 


Spanish Dancer (Patti Scialfa) 
An intriguing love song  and one were still trying to figure out.

 


My Bonnie Bonnie Boy (Trad) 
Another winsome lad, this time with two buxom lasses on the go.  This beautiful song was collected by Lucy Broadwood in Hampshire and appears in English County Songs published by JB Cramer & Co. Ltd.  

 


Bright Fine Gold (Trad) 
A song from New Zealand about an unsuccessful gold prospector.

 


Bonny Labouring Boy (Trad) 
Just to prove that nothing changes  girls are still being locked in their bedrooms!

 


No More (Brenda Orrell) 
Brenda has written so many good songs.  We heard Collin Orrell singing this one, and it struck a chord.

 


I Just Want To Be Like The Other Girls (Lynne Heraud) 
Lynne wrote this song music hall style.  An amusing song about a very serious subject! 

The Moon Shines Bright (Trad)
Sample not available
Autumn Is Down (Pat Turner)
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There’ll Never Be Peace Until Jamie Comes Home (Robert Burns)
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Odd Sock (Lynne Heraud)
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Where The Seeds Of Love Grew (Keith Scowcroft/Lynne Heraud)
Sample not available
Cupid’s Garden (Trad)
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Man In Grey (Pat Turner)
Sample not available
Fair Maid of Islington (Trad)
Sample not available
Regret (Lynne Heraud)
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The Golden Wheat
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Spanish Dancer (Patti Scialfa)
Sample not available
My Bonnie Bonnie Boy (Trad)
Sample not available
Bright Fine Gold (Trad)
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Bonny Labouring Boy (Trad)
Sample not available
No More (Brenda Orrell)
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I Just Want To Be Like The Other Girls (Lynne Heraud)
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Thefolkmag

John Denny

Lynne and Pats voices are very different to each other but contrast very

well. Pat plays the guitar. The opening track is The Moon Shines Bright

(trad). It has the air of being a traditional Easter carol. Autumn is Down

is written by Pat Turner about working the land, harvesting the grain before

it rains again. It is sung very effectively as an a cappella duet. Odd Sock,

written by Lynne Heraud, is a neatly written song for the single person. It

is pleasing to see another poem by Keith Scowcroft put to a tune by Lynne

Heraud and Where the Seeds of Love Grew is an excellent example of his work.

I like Cupids Garden (trad.) and particularly the way Pat and Lynne sing

it. Nothing fancy, just well and simply done. Fair Maid of Islington (trad.)

is a tale frequently encountered of wild oats sown and reaped (in this case)

in a law court. It is nicely done. Regret, written by Lynne Heraud,

expresses a type of emotional courage needed to end a relationship. Bright

Fine Gold is an unusual traditional song about a get rich quick person not

getting rich enough fast enough, if at all.

The chorus of No More (Brenda Orrell) is one I could quite happily join

with. It probably will not change anything but the thought of no more war

has timeless appeal that could have been written at any period of the last

two hundred years. The record ends with the comically heart rending I Just

Want to be Like the Other Girls (Heraud). The writing style is reminiscent

of Keith Marsden at his whimsical best.

Lynne and Pat have produced a very listenable CD and I look forward to more

from them.


Dai Woosnam

Dai Woosnam

If his duo from South east England are here building on the critical success of their first album �Parallel� which was released in April 2003. They are vastly experienced performers who are stalwarts of the UK folk scene.

Here they have come up with an album where ECLECTICISM seems to be the watchword. Both show their skills as songwriters (Turner's �Autumn Is Down� and Heraud's �Odd Sock� being perfectly respectable stabs at memorability); both know a traditional gem when they see one (the Coppers' �Cupid's Garden� and a favourite Welsh language song, here translated into English as �The Golden Wheat�); and they exhibit an admirable penchant for the Folk(ish) avant garde (as in their decision to run with Patti Scialfa's Dory Previn-like attempt at obfuscation with �Spanish Dancer�.

But on the odd occasion here their critical faculties desert them in their choice of song. For instance, toward the end of the CD they sing an anti-war song that doesn't really cut the mustard. And believe me, I wish it did. Nothing would please me more than to have it played to Bush, Blairescu and Hussein in their cells at the Hague, but were the fantasy to prove true and we were in that wonderful position, trust me, this song would have zero impact. It's got that Coca-Cola saccharine sweetness of wanting to teach the world to sing (and study war no more).

But, methinks a minor criticism. The album is a generally pleasing one, and one that will make a nice souvenir for fans who have just seen the duo in a folk club gig. The voices blend well, and Pat plays a competent guitar accompaniment.

EFN

JOHN NEW

Lynne & Pat are two of the most experienced harmony singers around. This CD has about a 50/50 mix of traditional and contemporary tracks all beautifully sang with occasional accompaniment. As expected, Lynnes own songs have that musical hall comedy feel to them but this is not my first choice of music; I find sixteen tracks of the same two voices, with little tonal variation, is a bit too much for me, but needless to say their harmonies are outstanding, clear bright diction and there is one advantage of CDs over older formats; you can dip in and have your fill very easily. I am sure there are many folk out there who will lap it up because the material is well chosen and performed to perfection and justifiable so Lynne & Pat have devout followers who I am sure will be delighted with this CD.  

Folk Northwest

Derek Gifford

While Lynne Heraud will probably be well known to Northern folk followers as the 'Hertfordshire Nightingale' and as the 'better-half' of a duo with Keith Kendrick,  Pat Turner, though none the lesser mortal, will perhaps be less familiar. Together Lynne and Pat make a delightful harmony duo with their long experience of singing showing through every track.

Having established their pedigree and their obvious ability as seasoned performers it remains only to comment on the material. As might be expected from these two many of the songs are traditional but not all of them are particularly well known and it is good to hear something 'new' from the tradition including 'Fair Maid of Islington' and 'Bright Fine Gold' which is from New Zealand. More familiar are 'Cupid's Garden' (gleaned from the Copper family), 'Bonny Labouring Boy', 'My Bonnie Bonnie Boy' and the title track.  

There are also a number of songs written by the lasses themselves. Of Lynne's own songs I enjoyed the 'Odd Sock' with which, as this household's laundry chief, I can identify! In contrast 'Regret' is a melancholy rendition with an optimistic ending while 'I Just Want to be Like the Other Girls' is typical Heraud comedy, its style firmly rooted in the Music Hall.

Not to be left out, Pat's 'Autumn is Down' sounds as though it has come straight from the tradition and the 'Man in Grey' is a wry comment on the state of.... well anything you want to think of really.

Lynne does a 'Giff' in adding a tune to one of Keith Scowcroft's fine poems 'Where the Seeds of Love Grew' which finds Scowie in a romantic and reflective mood (yes - honestly!).

The name Brenda Orrell from North Yorkshire will probably only be known to a handful of people but she writes some super songs and 'No More', an anti-war song, is a classic from her collection.

The majority of songs are unaccompanied but Pat plays an effective guitar to 'Spanish Dancer' by Patti Scialfa and to Robert Burns' 'There'll Never Be Peace Until Jamie Comes Home' which must also be one of the longest song titles I've ever come across!

Finally, my only other comment is on the production - excellent! Well, it is from Wild Goose and I wouldn't expect anything less. If  tight harmony singing is your thing then this CD is a must for your collection.

Living Tradition

Corinne Male

A fine, delicate collection of songs this, from two very experienced singers. Close harmony doesnt get much closer than this; Lynne Heraud and Pat Turners voices are pitched very close together and lie lightly on the ear. Generally, the arrangements follow the

pattern of the same voice taking the melody with a lower harmony ? and I cant work out, either from my memory of seeing these two live or from listening to Lynnes CD with Keith Kendrick which has been in my collection for some years, whose voice is which. Perhaps that is a measure of the close balance that comes from two singers who have been singing together for some years before the release of this CD.

According to the sleeve notes. Pat plays concertina and spoons but the only instrument here to break up the pure sound of the human voice is her gentle guitar accompaniments on two tracks.

Both Lynne and Pat have many years of experience organising clubs and harmony workshops, and a keen ear for identifying potential material when they hear it. They say their leaning is towards traditional songs, but these comprise only six and a half tracks out of the 16 here (the 1/2 is Robert Burns, who certainly ought to count as trad. by now). There are songs here from several writers (including themselves); most striking perhaps being No More, from Brenda Orrell, inspired by recent wars but distressingly applicable across the generations ? the theme that we never learn from history. Most puzzling is Spanish Dancer, which the artists claim they are still trying to understand themselves!

A good album for aspiring singers ? you could do a lot worse than learn from mistresses of the trade like Lynne and Pat (no traditional double meanings intended, ladies!)

Shreds and Patches

Tim Willets

Lynne Heraud and Pat Turner have been established singers in folk clubs and at festivals, either solo or in a variety of combinations, for some time. As a duo they sing two-part harmony, either unaccompanied or supported by Pat Turners guitar. Their close?harmony style allows their voices to blend well, with one in particular (sorry, I dont know whos) adding a gentle vibrato to what is overall a competent, relaxed (and relaxing) sound and its clear they are very comfortable both singing with each other and with their chosen material.

Six of the 16 tracks on The Moon Shines Bright are traditional, with the rest being from a diverse range of mostly contemporary songwriters - including the singers themselves - and including an Anglicised version of Burns There Are Few Good Fellows When Jamies Awa; whilst the singers themselves take or share the songwriting credits on five tracks. A couple of their own songs stand out, Pat Turners Autumn Is Down, a (perhaps slightly romanticised) seasonal look at agricultural life and love in times past, and Lynne Herauds I Just Want To Be Like The Other Girls, a music-hall inspired song taking a not entirely serious look at the difficulties of love/lust/finding a partner. The highlight of the CD for me though is their version of the Copper familys Cupids Garden, a favourite with harmony singers everywhere (and with good reason) - in fact, the traditional songs are overall perhaps the strongest here.

The Moon Shines Bright is a collection of well sung songs, some familiar, others less so. Theres nothing too demanding on the ears and if youre looking for a companion to a relaxed glass of red or two it deserves your

attention.

Unicorn

Alan

Unaccompanied two-part harmony doesnt get better than this. Sixteen tracks, and nearly 48 minutes. Of these, 7 are Trad or Trad +, and the others include 2 written by Pat, 3 from Lynne, and I co?written by Lynne & Keith Scowcroft.

A good mix, ranging from the unexpectedly philosophical Odd Sock and the music-hall style I just want to be like the other girls, to the unashamedly romantic Where the Seeds of Love Grew, not forgetting old favourites Cupids Garden (from the Copper family) and the bawdy Fair Maid of Islington

The harmonies are solid and unwavering, the words are sung clearly and totally together - not easy, even with only two voices. Lynne generally takes the tune with her clean soprano, and Pats warm mezzo confidently underpins. Pats guitar add to the mix on two tracks. Doug Bailey at Wildgoose Studios has done a top job recording - no tricks, just clean and true. This is their 2nd album, and should be on the buy-list of all lovers of good harmony singing.

Whats Afoot

This is a particularly delightful CD. An example of two-part harmony at its very best.

Though probably little known to many here in the deep South West, both Lynn Heraud and Pat Turner are recognised nationally as well established performers, both as solo artists and in combination with others - Lynne with Keith Kendrick was one of the guests at Wadebridge Festival 2004.

When I initially listened to the first track on this CD The Moon Shines Bright, in spite of the excellence of their singing, I did have just one small reservation. That being, would sixteen tracks of female vocal purity begin to pall? I can assure the reader that it did not. It didnt because of the diverse selection of material chosen, traditional, quasi-music hall, humorous to contemporary  with superlative harmonies applied and in two instances to Pats guitar accompaniment. There are one or two instances of double-tracking, a technique which I, in the main, frown upon. However, in respect of this CD it is tastefully and appropriately applied to musically beneficial effect, i.e. not to just create more volume.

Pat and Lynne, in the main, lean twards traditional English song but that in no way inhibits their considerable ability to write their own material, Autumn is Down by Pat and 1 Just Want To Be Like The Other Girls by Lynne are perfect examples of this. And I must not fail to mention Keith Scowcrofts Where The Seeds Of Love Grew put to music by Lynne ? brilliant. I wonder how many people in the South West sing Scowies poems and are oblivious to the fact?

Sometime ago, I heard Lynn Heraud described, as the `Hertfordshire linnet, which I think, is an apt description of her singing. Lynn Herauds soaring voice underpinned by and in combination with tire warm timbre of Pat Turners voice is a perfect musical balance. They are the best female duo that I have heard for many years