Straight from the Fingers

by Bursledon Village Band

Most of the tunes are English but there are a few from further afield, all played in the bands distinctive Southern English style, slightly slower than bands from the North of England and with more emphasis on the rhythmic nature of the tunes. The Band was formed in early 1977. In 1979 it won an award from B.B.C. Radio Solent as the most popular Barn Dance Band and received similar awards in 1980 and 1982. The musicians are: Dave Ingledew on Melodeon, Joyce Ingledew on Fiddle, Mathew Parker on Keyboards, Paul Johnson on Drums, Graham Pretty on Anglo Concertina and Simon Harmer on Tuba and Tenor Horn.



A great selection of dance tunes from The Bursledon Village Band. Most of the tunes are English but there are a few from further afield, all played in the bands distinctive Southern English style, slightly slower than bands from the North of England and with more emphasis on the rhythmic nature of the tunes.. Most of the tunes are 32 bars long but there are also a couple of 48 bar tunes, one a polka and the other a reel, which should be useful to callers looking for something other than straight 32 bar tunes. The Band was formed in early 1977. In 1979 it won an award from B.B.C. Radio Solent as the most popular Barn Dance Band and received similar awards in 1980 and 1982. At that time half of the band lived in Bursledon, a village on the bank of the River Hamble, a few miles to the East of Southampton. In recent years, the band has also done a great many Folk Festival performances, including Sidmouth, Chippenham, Whitby, Bognor Easter Festival, Gosport, Isle-of-Wight, Winchester, Wimborne and Towersey festivals, as well as smaller local festivals.

Petes Peerie Boat/The Pipers Poodle
Sample not available
Walter Bulwers No. 3/Freds Pigeon
Sample not available
The Millennium Waltz/The Comet Waltz
Sample not available
Some Say the Devils Dead/Hunting the Hare
Sample not available
Galopede/Little Polly/Grandfathers
Sample not available
Webbs Wonders Polka
Sample not available
Sharon Eubank
Sample not available
Walter Bulwers No. 1/The Blue Eyed Stranger
Sample not available
The BVB March/The Rochdale Coconut Dance
Sample not available
The Kerry Polka
Sample not available
Jig by Greenland/Muckin o Georgies Byre
Sample not available
The Rose Waltz
Sample not available
Reel des Accordionistes
Sample not available

Dirty Linen

IE

The Bursledon Village Band, a six?piece dance band from southern England, was formed well over 20 years ago with a stated devotion to playing music for dancers. The group has performed widely in the Southampton region and on the festival circuit throughout Britain. This CD, part of a dance series released by Wild Goose Records, shows how strong emphasis on the rhythm and the occasional inclusion of the tuba both help to give the band that English oom?pah country dance sound. The tunes offer melodeon?led jigs, polkas, waltzes, hornpipes, and schottisches, most of which are from England, though a few are from Scotland (such as The Muckin O Geordies Byre) and Ireland (The Kerry Polka) and from Quebec (Reel des Accordeonistes). Other instruments include fiddle, concertina, keyboards, and percussion. The tunes are played with lift, designed to give the dancers the energy to make it through the set, as on the polka set of Walter Bulwers No. 1/The Blue Eyed Stranger and the two schottisches, Some Say the Devils Dead/Hunting the Hare. As one dancer noted about this music, It goes in the ears and comes out at the

feet. Well said.  

Shire Folk

Chris Mills

This is an album of dance tunes, polkas, jigs, waltzes, scottisches, plus a set of French Canadian reels. It includes versions of the Walter Bulwer polkas and other well known tunes, such as Galopede and Blue Eyed Stranger. The line up is melodeon, fiddle, keyboard, concertina and percussion The music is neatly and rhythmically played and the beat is clear and good to dance to. The Rose Waltz features some nicely arranged fiddle. If you love English dance music and yearn to feel the bounce and jostle of those packed Saturday night dances as you drive to work or cook the dinner mid?week, if you attend or run a dance club, if you attend English music sessions, or if you are looking to increase your folk dance repertoire then this is for you.